Training/Occupation Info

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Canada's building and construction unions have a lot to offer Canada's Veterans. Click on the trade below to find out about each union.


International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers
ironworkers logo

Trades

Boilermaker
Rebar Installer
Non Destructive Testing Technicians
Welder

We fabricate, install, erect, dismantle and maintain the components and structures from the Light Commercial through the Heavy Industrial sector. (Tanks, process towers, smokestacks, etc…) The dangers of this career require a major emphasis on Safety Training which enables our members to perform the following skills:

  • Major concentration on High Pressure and Structural Welding, along with various cutting procedures is used. Our welders must qualify with many processes, procedures and metallurgy. We employ the latest technologies to meet the ever changing worksites.
  • Rigging, signaling, and hoisting materials and equipment from small winches through the largest cranes in the world
  • Steel Fabrication, Erection & Dismantling
  • Inspection & Testing
  • Scaffold Erection & Dismantling
  • Blueprint Interpretation
  • Bolting & Torquing of pressure vessels and structural components

  • Apprenticeship

    This four year program provides an opportunity for hard working women and men to earn while you learn through a combination of self study, classroom and on the job training. Participants train at one of the 12 training centers across Canada. Once learned, these skills along with a safe work attitude, Union brotherhood and pride in craftsmanship will produce an effective and productive worker for the future of our industry.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Boilermakers wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Boilermakers and boilermaker mechanics make, install, and repair boilers, vats, and other large vessels that hold liquids and gases. Boilers supply steam to drive huge turbines in electric power plants and to provide heat and power in buildings, factories, and ships. Chemicals, oil, beer, and hundreds of other products are processed and stored in tanks and vats. Boilers and other high-pressure vessels are usually made in sections, by casting each piece out of molten iron or steel. Small boilers may be assembled in the manufacturing plant; larger boilers are usually assembled on site. Following blueprints for installing boilers and other vessels, boilermakers locate and mark reference points on the boiler foundation, using straightedges, squares, transits, and tape measures. Boilermakers attach rigging and signal crane operators to lift heavy frame and plate sections and other parts into place. They align sections, using plumb bobs, levels, wedges, and turnbuckles. Boilermakers use hammers, files, grinders, and cutting torches to remove irregular edges so edges fit properly. Then they bolt or weld edges together. Boilermakers align and attach water tubes, stacks, valves, gauges, and other parts and test complete vessels for leaks or other defects. Usually they assemble large vessels temporarily in a fabrication shop to insure a proper fit before final assembly on the permanent site.

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    United Brotherhood of Carpenters
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    Trades

    Carpenter
    Floorlayer
    Interior Systems Installer
    Millwright
    Pile driver

    Members of the UBC are commercial and residential carpenters, floor layers, millwrights, pile drivers, interior systems carpenters, lathers, cabinetmakers and trade show carpenters. They build forms for concrete and frame buildings, walls, footings, columns and stairs. Carpenters also install doors, windows, storefronts and hand rails, and build cabinets, counter tops and finished stair handrails. Carpenters must read blueprints, measure accurately and calculate dimensions. UBC comprises 1,035 locals, 63 district councils, 21 regional councils, 15 state councils, and 2 Canadian provincial councils.

    Apprenticeship

    The UBC apprenticeship programs offer life-long careers in the construction industry. A UBC apprentice is someone who learns a trade while working under the guidance of a skilled journey level worker. Apprentices attend 4 weeks of hands-on training per year at one of 180 training centers located throughout the country. Apprenticeship programs are available to anyone who is interested in becoming a UBC apprentice and who is willing to apply him/herself to learning a trade.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Carpenters wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Carpenters build all types of structures from office buildings, to shopping malls, factories, and sports stadiums. Residential Carpenters build single unit homes, town homes, condominiums, and apartments. Millwrights install, repair, replace, and maintain all machinery in all types of industrial applications including auto manufacturing plants, steel mills, paper mills and nuclear power plants. Cabinetmakers build and install cabinets, store fixtures, tradeshow displays, doors and windows, and moldings. Pile drivers install the underpinnings for buildings and bridges, build docks and wharfs, and supply commercial underwater divers for a variety of tasks. Floor Coverers install carpet, vinyl, and hardwood on floors and walls. Interior Systems Carpenters build interior walls and partitions with steel studs and apply the finish surfaces to walls and ceilings in commercial and residential buildings. Drywall Applicator Specialists specialize in the application of drywall in commercial and residential buildings. Acoustical Carpenter Specialists specialize in the application of acoustical ceilings in commercial and residential buildings. Lather Specialists specialize in layout, framing, and application of supported and freestanding lath that supports plaster finishes.

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    International Brotherhood of Electricians
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    Trades

    Electrician
    Powerline Technician

    The IBEW represents workers in the electrical industry including construction, gas and electric utilities, telecommunications, railroads and government agencies. Construction and residential electricians work in all phases of the electrical construction and service industry. Their worksite ranges from single-family residences to state-of-the-art industrial plants. Inside wire workers may install and maintain conduits, switches and converters, as well as wire lighting, to complex systems incorporating computerization and high technology. Electricians work in the electric sign industry and increasingly perform more work in the installation of fiber optics and voice/data/video equipment. IBEW electricians participate in a five-year apprentice program.
    There are four specialty areas where you will find electrical workers. These four areas are best described by the type of work done in each of those areas.

  • Outside Linemen are the electrical workers who install the distribution and transmission lines that move power from power plant to a factory, a business, or your home.
  • Inside Wiremen are electrical workers who install the power, lighting, controls and other electrical equipment in commercial and industrial buildings.
  • VDV Installer Technicians are electrical workers who install circuits and equipment for telephones, computer networks, video distribution systems, security and access control systems and other low voltage systems.
  • Residential Wiremen are electrical workers who specialize in installing all of the electrical systems in single-family and multi-family houses or dwellings.
  • Apprenticeship

    Each of the four types of electrical work (inside Wireman, Outside Lineman, Installer Technician and Residential Wireman) share common skills and knowledge. Each also has other skills and knowledge, which are specific to that particular area of work. Because of these differences, each type of work has a different apprenticeship program associated with it. Apprentices receive their training through the National Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee of NECA (National Electrical Contractors Association) and IBEW. It's a model education partnership which produces the best-trained, most up-to-date electrical apprentices and journeymen in the country. In addition to receiving skill training on the job, apprentices are provided trade related classroom training that produces competency and pride which lead to true craftsmanship. Quite often some local training committees provide special classes with hands-on training to support classroom lectures and discussions.

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Electrical Workers wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Electricians can specialize as a Lineman, an Inside Wireman, an Installer/Technician, or a Residential Wireman. Journeymen Linemen erect and maintain power lines, climb power poles, and work on communication lines. It's highly skilled work that requires a great deal of concentration, skill and knowledge. Demand for this type of work will never go "out of style"... as long as folks use electricity. Joumeymen Wireman wire the industrial plants and factories, the warehouses, the office buildings, the shopping centers small and large... when something goes wrong with the electrical system in such facilities, journeyman wiremen are the ones who are called. Residential Wiremen are responsible for the repair and upgrade work in residential structures. With 90 million single family homes in the U.S., demand just for the repair/upgrade work will never cease. What's more, as more and more people buy computers, and buy items with electronic components that are sensitive to electric power quality, there's more need for the Residential Wireman's skills. Telecommunications -installer Technician are responsible for the wiring that makes the Internet and e-commerce possible. Communication industries rely on something installed everyday by our industry: wires and cables. When building owners and tenants have network wiring problems, they need a professional telecom installer/technician and he or she becomes the most important person in the building!

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    International Union of Elevator Constructors
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    Trades

    Elevator Constructor

    The IUEC represent the most qualified and trained elevator constructors in the world. Members assemble, install and replace elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walkways and similar equipment in new and old buildings. Elevator constructors also maintain and repair this equipment once it is in service, as well as modernize older equipment.

    Apprenticeship

    Elevator Constructor apprentices are registered with the National Elevator Industry Education Program. This program of study requires five years to complete to take the mechanic examination. There are two more years of study to complete the program.

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Elevator Constructors wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Elevator constructors perform the construction, operation, inspection, testing, maintenance, alteration, and repair of elevators, platform lifts, stairway chair lifts, escalators, moving walks, dumbwaiters, material lifts, and automatic transfer devices. They also perform the construction, operation, inspection, maintenance, alteration and repair of automatic guided transit vehicles such as automated people movers. Individuals perform this work while working at heights, around exposed electrical contacts and moving sheaves and cables.

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    International Union of Operating Engineers heating and cooling logo

    Trades

    Heavy Equipment Mechanic
    Heavy Equipment Operators
    Mobile Crane Operator
    Tower Crane Operator

    Apprenticeship

    Each of the trades (stationary or hoisting and portable engineer) uses an apprenticeship system. Hours and course description vary between the two classifications, but both have one common goal: to make the Operating Engineer apprentice the most knowledgeable about his/her craft. The National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committees have seen the need to update and streamline programs that include training both in the field and practical hands-on training at dedicated training facilities. With new innovations being introduced every day, these programs are constantly retooling to make their apprentices smarter, safer, and more productive, to ready them for today's contractors.
    Competitive starting wages and progressive wage increases enhance the Operating Engineer apprenticeship programs and add to the apprenticeship goal of "earn while you learn."

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Operating Engineers wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Across America and Canada, the Operating Engineers build, maintain, and service places where we live, work, worship, study and play. Operating Engineers maintain control centers, boiler rooms, and HVAC units for our safety, comfort, and well-being, and their skills are put to the task every day.
    Hoisting and Portable Operating Engineers work on high, operating construction cranes, as well as in deep excavations with earth moving equipment. They turn lines on paper into skylines and roadways across the USA and Canada. Contractors look to the Operating Engineers and its 400,000 members, for their skills, safety, and proficiency. The Operating Engineer has the respect and control to build the foundations of the world. There is not a better feeling than physically seeing the fruits of your labour, and that's the feeling you get from being an Operating Engineer.

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    International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers
    heating and cooling logo

    Trades

    Heat and Frost Insulator

    Members of this union apply insulation to pipes, tanks, boilers, ducts, refrigeration equipment and other surfaces requiring thermal control of temperatures. The responsibilities of these mechanics, improvers and apprentices also include the manufacturing, fabrication, assembling, molding, handling, erection, spraying, pouring, mixing, hanging, preparation, application, adjusting, alternation, repairing, dismantling, reconditioning, corrosion control, testing, maintenance, removal and clean up of heat, frost, or sound insulation, such as magnesia, asbestos, hair felt, wool felt, cork, mineral wool, infusorial earth, mercerized silk, flax fiber, fire felt, asbestos paper, asbestos curtain, asbestos millboard, fibrous glass, foam glass, styrofoam, polyurethane, polystyrene, metals, plastics, fibrous matt, roving and resins, acoustical sound pads, or other materials used in our craft, or substitutes for these materials, or any labour connected with the handling or distributing of insulating materials on job premises, including the operation of all equipment associated with the work described above.
    They also install firestopping materials and are engaged in the manufacture, fabrication, assembling molding, handling, erection, spraying, pouring, mixing, hanging, preparation, application, adjusting, alteration, repairing, dismantling, reconditioning, testing, and maintenance of the following, when applied by machine or other application methods of all firestopping materials including, but not limited to: intumescent firestop sealant, intumescent firestop blocks, elastomeric firestop sealant, self-leveling firestop sealant, trowelable firestop compound, firestop collars, composite sheets, putty pads, fire containment pillows, wrap strips, putty sticks, firestop mortar, firestop mastic, refractory ceramic fiber blanket for kitchen exhaust and fire rated duct systems, or other materials used in connection with labour, and to include other fire protection materials such as boots and cable coatings which are connected with the handling or distributing of the above insulating materials, or the repair and maintenance of all equipment, on job premises. The types of work shall include but not be limited to: top of wall, curtain wall, fire rated wall penetrations, grease ducts, stairwell pressurization systems, beam, column, and deck fireproofing.

    Apprenticeship

    The apprenticeship program emphasizes on-the-job training and classroom instruction, as well as the use of textbooks and other course materials that give participants a thorough knowledge of the trade. Apprentices are employed by an insulation contractor who pays an appropriate wage and benefit package. Apprentices work side by side with a qualified mechanic on job sites. When apprentices are not at the job site, they are attending classes taught by highly qualified instructors chosen for their knowledge and expertise. Upon completion of apprenticeship, apprentices are required to take an examination to demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills. This is the apprenticeship experience - practical, "hands-on" learning, backed up by excellent classroom instruction and course materials. Apprentices earn while they learn, placing them on an immediate path toward economic security and stability.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Insulators wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Insulation workers install many different types of insulating materials for basically five purposes: to prevent heat transfer, to conserve energy, to retard freezing, to protect personnel from burns and to control fire hazards. Today, insulating materials are used in energy conservation efforts to increase operational efficiency and reduce fuel costs. Properly insulated buildings reduce energy consumption by keeping heat in during the winter and out in the summer. Insulating is performed in virtually every type of residential and commercial building in the country, as well as industrial plants, chemical factories, nuclear power plants, and military and space facilities. Insulation mechanics select and install the proper material for each and every type of insulation application. Insulation is installed using a variety of techniques-stapling, wiring, pasting or spraying depending on the type of surface to which the insulating material is being applied. For example, in order to insulate a steam pipe, insulation must be measured and cut to the required length, stretched open along the cut that runs the length of the insulation, and slipped over the pipe. The insulation is then secured by stapling, taping, or wrapping and fastening wire bands around it. A protective sealant, finish or cover is then applied over the outside of the insulating material to help protect it. Basic insulating materials can include fiberglass, mineral wool, ceramic fiber, cellular glass, cellular foam, polyethylene, polystyrene, calcium silicate, perlite and insulating cements. Protective coverings include coatings of cement or mastics, reinforced paper, tar paper, canvass cloth, plastic, laminates and metals.

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    International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Ornamental Ironworker
    Rebar Installer
    Rigger
    Steel Erector
    Steel Plate Fabricator
    Welder

    Members of the Ironworkers assemble and erect steel framework and other metal parts in buildings and on bridges, dams, skyscrapers, factories and other steel structures. They raise, place and join steel girders and columns to form structural frameworks, including the welding for metal decking.

    Apprenticeship

    Apprenticeship training in the Ironworking industry is a formal arrangement involving: the Joint Apprenticeship Committees (Trade Improvement Committees in Canada), federal government and/or state government, Ironworkers schools, employers and the individual wanting to learn the trade. The apprenticeship program is a combination of on-the-job training supervised by highly skilled journey persons at a job site and related classroom instruction. Apprenticeship training provides a lifetime skill and knowledge that can be transferred from one employer to another and from one area of the country to another. Depending on the program, the term of apprenticeship is three or four years. A graduated apprentice (journey person) is a proven worker with advancement opportunities as foreman, general foreman and superintendent. Owning one's business is a realistic goal of an experienced journey person.

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Ironworkers wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of work will I do?

    Ironworkers are employed in the construction of industrial, commercial and residential buildings, powerhouses, dams, bridges and highway structures. Ironworkers fabricate, erect, assemble and install iron, steel, brass, bronze, aluminum, glass, composite materials, fiberglass, fence, reinforced concrete materials, pre-cast/pre-stressed concrete, metal buildings, stairs, ladders, platforms, catwalks, curtain wall, windows, window wall, metal siding and metal roof materials, fencing, guardrails, tanks and vessels. Ironworkers also move machinery and do a variety of maintenance work in industrial plans. Ironworkers use a variety of hand and power-operated tools. Ironwork consists of several sub-trades: Rigging, Structural, Ornamental, Reinforcing, Fencing, Metal Buildings and Welding. Most Ironworkers are skilled in all of these sub-trades which offer versatility and value in the job market.

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    Laborers' International Union of North America (LiUNA!)
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Blaster
    Cement Finisher
    Construction Craft Worker
    Demolition Worker
    Finisher
    Form Setter
    Labourer
    Mason Tender
    Pipelayer

    LIUNA represents members working in construction, environmental remediation, maintenance, food service, health care, clerical and other occupations, as well as in state, local and municipal government jobs and as mail handlers in the U.S. Postal Service. LIUNA members have helped lay down new highways, build spectacular bridges, dig tunnels and subways, build new plants, factories, dams and power plants, and erect new schools, churches, hospitals and houses. In building construction and housing, Laborers' work includes excavation, footing and foundations, carpenter tending, compaction, concrete placement, power and hand tools, general clean-up and mason tending for bricklayers. Environmental laborers do asbestos removal, hazardous waste and radiation clean-up. The work performed by Laborers is very physical and it includes digging, carrying, pulling and bending--usually outside in all kinds of weather for long hours at a time.

    Apprenticeship

    Formal apprenticeship programs provide thorough preparation for jobs as Construction Craft Laborers (CCL). There are over 80 CCL apprenticeship programs in the United States operated under guidelines established by the LIUNA Training and Education Fund. Programs include at least 4,000 hours of on-the-job training, with 144 hours of classroom training. Apprentices learn the skills necessary to work on buildings, highways and heavy construction sites; tunnel and shaft excavations; demolition and environmental remediation sites and must master the skills before they complete the program. Entry requirements vary from state to state, but all apprenticeship programs require the individual to be 18 years old (see School-to-Career below for exceptions), must be able to read, write, comprehend, and understand the classroom material, and be physically able to do the work of the trade. Most CCL apprenticeship programs require drug testing after acceptance into the program and prior to working in the field.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Laborers wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Construction Craft Laborers (CCL's) are skilled workers who provide much of the physically demanding labour at construction projects, tunnel and shaft excavations, environmental remediation projects, and demolition sites. They clean and prepare sites, dig trenches, mix and place concrete, and set braces to support the sides of excavations. At environmental remediation projects, they perform material and atmospheric sampling; build, clean, and decontaminate enclosure structures; remove, package, and transport hazardous materials. Other highly specialized tasks include operating laser guidance equipment to place pipes, and setting explosives for tunnel, shaft, and road construction. In addition to these duties, construction craft laborers may assist other craft workers. Construction craft laborers operate a variety of equipment including pavement breakers; jackhammers; earth tampers; concrete, mortar, and plaster mixers; guided boring machines; small mechanical hoists; laser beam equipment; surveying and measuring equipment; and monitoring and sampling equipment.

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    International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Brick Mason
    Cement Finisher
    Cement Mason
    Finisher
    Marble Mason
    Marble, Mosaic and Terrazzo Worker
    Plasterer
    Pointer-Cleaner-Caulkers
    Stone Mason
    Tile Setter

    BAC represents an array of skilled workers who practice the crafts of bricklaying, plastering, tile setting, stone, marble and cement masonry and terrazzo and mosaic work. These craftsmen also conduct pointing/cleaning/caulking, restoration and refractory work.

    Apprenticeship

    The International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craft workers' apprenticeship and training system is widely recognized for producing highly skilled craft workers. Through Local union programs and those offered through the International Masonry Institute, BAC members and contractors have access to training opportunities unmatched in the masonry industry.
    These training programs are jointly funded by labour and management through collectively bargained contributions. These contributions are evidence of BAC's and its signatory contractors' commitment to develop highly skilled masonry craft workers.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen bricklayers earn wages and fringe benefits that are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    BAC craft workers build, repair and renovate structures, and portions of structures that are made of brick and other clay products, structural tile, concrete, cement, stone, marble, glassblock, terra cotta, tile, terrazzo, plaster, mosaics, castables and artificial masonry units made of any material. Their work includes laying and setting installation or application of all such materials and the preparation of all structures or components to receive such materials. The skilled crafts represented by the BAC, often called the trowel trades, are Bricklaying and Block Laying, Concrete Masonry, Plastering, Pointing, Caulking and Restoration, Refractory and Industrial Masonry, Stone and Marble Masonry, Terrazzo Work, Tile Laying and Mosaic Work.

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    International Union of Painters and Allied Trades
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Drywall Finisher
    Glazier
    Painter and Decorator

    The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT) represents a growing force of over 140,000 working men and women in the United States and Canada. IUPAT's members work in the finishing trades as painters, drywall finishers, wallcoverers, glaziers, glass workers, floor covering installers, sign makers, display workers, convention and show decorators, and in many more exciting occupations. Tradesmen's skills are in high demand at every construction project in North America. The IUPAT membership extends beyond far beyond the workplace, however. Recognized as one of the most active unions in the labour movement, IUPAT members help shape their communities in many ways: through an abiding commitment to service, by fighting passionately for workers' rights that benefit all working families, and through effective and aggressive political mobilization.

    What do Painters do?
  • Painters remove and apply protective and decorative coatings to homes, office buildings, bridges, factories, ships and other structures.
  • Drywall Finishers apply multiple coats to sheet rock to prepare it to be painted or have other decorative finishes or materials applied.
  • Glaziers (Architectural metal and glass workers) fabricate and install aluminum and glass storefronts, doors, windows, and curtain systems and other related products.
  • Floor and Decorative Covering Workers install all resilient, carpet and floor systems either as a decorative covering or topping in residential, commercial or industrial settings.
  • Sign and Display Workers make signs which are designed for advertising - both standard billboards and more complex, lighted billboards. They also set up and dismantle the display booths which are used to provide information at trade shows.
  • Apprenticeship

    All apprenticeship programs incorporate skills training with safety and health training. Apprentices are taught about the International Union of Painters and Allied Crafts (IUPAT) and how the union operates. All apprentices are paid and receive regular raises during the course of their apprenticeship. Sign and Display workers have a two-year apprenticeship, Painters, Drywall Finishers and Floor Coverers participate in a three-year apprenticeship, and Glaziers have a four year apprenticeship.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Painters wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    IUPAT members work in one or more of several crafts: painting, wallpaper hanging, glazing (glass work), drywall and taping, floor covering, and sign and display work. Painters and paperhangers work in industrial, commercial and residential settings, from bridges and ships to interior walls of office buildings and homes. Drywall finishers tape, fill in and smooth seams in sheets of drywall. Glaziers prepare and install various kinds of glass, mirrors, metal framing and doors/entrances to buildings. Floor coverers work with resilient floors, as well as carpet and decorative coverings. Exterior sign and display work, like billboards, is another choice. Other types of work are convention display and show decorators.

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    Operative Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association of the United States and Canada
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Cement Mason
    Fireproofer
    Restoration Steeplejack

    OP & CMIA members represent skilled plasterers, cement masons, shop hands and associated members. Plasterers finish interior walls and ceilings of buildings; apply plaster on masonry, metal, and wire lath or gypsum. Bridges, canals, dams, reservoirs, roads and many other engineering feats would be impossible without the skills of OP & CMIA cement masons. Cement masons are responsible for all concrete construction, including pouring and finishing of slabs, steps, wall tops, curbs and gutters, sidewalks, paving and other concrete construction.

    What do Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons Do?
    Plasterers’ Work includes these valuable skills:
  • All Types of Plastering
  • Exterior Insulated Finish System (EIFS) Application – including the installation of the insulation board whether adhesive-applied or fastened with mechanical fasteners.
  • Restoration Work
  • Acoustical Tile Application
  • Artificial Marble Work
  • Fireproofing Application
  • Epoxy Coating Application
  • Sculpturing
  • Swimming Pool Interior Application
  • Wallboard Taper and Joiner/Drywall Application/ Level 5 Drywall Skim coating
  • Modern Veneer and Hardcoat Applications
  • Cornice and Ornamental Plastering
  • Building Illusions and Props for the Motion Picture Industry
  • and more!
  • Cement Masons’ Work includes these valuable skills:
  • Concrete Finishing on Buildings, Highways, Sidewalks, Curbs and Gutters
  • Concrete Saw and Scoring Machine Operation
  • Floor Hardeners, Sealers and Curing Applications
  • Gunite Operation
  • Laser Screed Operation
  • Installing Seamless Flooring (Epoxy)
  • Sand Blasting and Bush Hammering
  • Restoration Work (Concrete Repair)
  • Waterproofing
  • Form Setting
  • Grouting
  • Epoxy Coatings Application
  • Decorative Concrete: Stenciled, Stamped, Stained
  • and more!
  • Apprenticeship

    As part of its long-standing tradition of pursuit of excellence, the OPCMIA, in the post-war era, began to establish apprenticeship to assure a constant supply of highly skilled craftsmen. Just as the OPCMIA advocated use of quality materials, it also demanded quality Plasterers and Cement Finishers who were properly trained in the craft. In 1946 the union joined with the Contracting Plasterers' International Association and the Associated General Contractors to establish the National Apprentice Training Standards. Through this program the union was able to guarantee a steady flow of qualified Plasterers and Cement Finishers to an ever-expanding construction industry. Working closely with the Veterans' Administration, the union indentured a large number of returning servicemen into apprenticeship programs..
    OPCMIA Apprentices receive a minimum of 144 hours of classroom training, plus hands-on and/or on-the-job training.

    What type of job will I do?

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographical location of the local union. Wages are determined as a percentage of the journeyperson’s wage and increase throughout the apprenticeship program as your knowledge and skills increase.

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    United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Gasfitter
    Instrumentation Technician
    Non Destructive Testing Technicians
    Pipeliner
    Plasterer
    Plumber
    Production Shop Employees
    QCC Technician
    Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic
    Sprinkler System Installers
    Steamfitter / Pipefitter
    Welder

    UA is a multi-craft union that represents plumbers and pipe, sprinkler, and refrigeration fitters, as well as service technicians. All of these jobs require the installation, remodeling or maintenance of systems that carry water, steam, air and other liquids or gases necessary for sanitation, industrial production, heating and air conditioning, and many other uses. Workers measure, cut, and bend pipe, as well as weld, braze, caulk, solder, glue or thread joints at residential and commercial job sites.

    What do Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Do?
  • Install, Remodel, and Maintain Various Sanitation and Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
  • Measure, Cut, and Bend Pipe
  • Weld, Braze, Caulk, Solder, Glue or Thread Joints at Residential and Commercial Job Sites
  • Apprenticeship

    To join the UA without any prior experience, individuals enter a United Association five-year apprenticeship program and are part of a select group of men and women motivated to learn a complex and challenging trade while upholding the ideals of trade unionism.
    Applicants are evaluated on the same fair basis, without regard to race, sex, national origin or religious affiliation.
    UA apprentices learn through both classroom and on-the-job training in what is considered by many to be the best construction industry apprentice program in the world. The five-year apprenticeship period is divided into one-year segments, each of which includes 1,700 to 2,000 hours of on-the-job training and a minimum of 216 hours of related classroom instruction.
    All UA apprentices receive a strong general education background in the trade, with core courses in basics such as mathematics, drawing and so on. At a certain point, apprentices can choose a specific path to follow, to become trained as a journeyman plumber, pipe fitter, sprinkler fitter, service mechanic, and so on. Apprenticeship is not an easy time: UA apprentices must work the same hours as journeymen plus attend night classes. Yet, this can be a highly rewarding career path for an individual who is motivated to learn the piping trade and become an active member of a proud and noble trade union.

    Certification Programs
    Certification is the wave of the future in the piping industry. With the increasingly complex and challenging work that must be done by the modern pipe mechanic, it is almost required that craftsmen seek some form of official validation of their skills. In addition to the considerable prestige and knowledge that comes with being a UA journeyman, UA members can also pursue these certifications in a variety of specialized areas. UA Certification Programs include valve repair, medical gas installation, welding, CFC removal, and instrumentation. Each of these programs relies on third party validation for an objective evaluation and testing of our members' skills and abilities.
  • Welder's Certification Program
    The UA Welder Certification Program has no parallel in the building and construction industry. Developed and designed to help meet the growing need for experienced, quality welders.
    The program provides pre-tested, certified and immediately available journeymen welders throughout the United States and Canada at no cost to the construction user. The United Association underwrites the cost of testing and qualifying its welders by independent testers, auditors and other third parties involved in the program's success.
  • Who Needs UA Certified Welders?
    America's power companies are leading the way in signing on to the United Association Welder Certification Program. In construction and maintenance of critical assurance of continuing compliance with the energy industry's demanding quality and safety standards.
    Breweries and other food and beverage producers; pharmaceutical, educational, medical, and correctional facilities; malls and other large commercial developments all depend on quality workmanship.
  • UA's Welder Certification Process
    UA welders are tested at local training sites across the United States and Canada under a consistent set of guidelines and rules.
    Applicants are tested on the welding processes most commonly used on the majority of construction projects. Welders can choose to seek certification in any or all processes.

    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Plumbers and Pipefitters wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    UA members (plumbers, pipefitters, sprinklerfitters, refrigeration fitters, and service technicians) are involved in just about every aspect of construction involving piping from the space program to nuclear power houses to refineries to shipbuilding. UA craftsmen ply their skills in commercial, industrial and residential arenas. They may be found on jobsites involving single family homes, garden and high-rise apartment buildings, large and small office buildings, power plants, chemical installations and factories. At this very moment, there may also be UA members at work installing complicated medical gas piping in your local hospital or putting sprinkler systems in the hotel where you will take your family on vacation. Other UA members are laying pipelines that stretch across the landscape to serve your community's energy needs. Visitors to the 1996 Olympic venues in Atlanta, Georgia and sports enthusiasts trekking to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio all have seen firsthand just a few of the many recent projects built or expanded with the craftsmanship of UA members.

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  • Sheet Metal Workers' International Association (SMART)
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Architectural Metals and Panels
    Coping and Flashing
    Decking Installer
    Roofer
    Sheet Metal Workers
    Siding Installer

    SMWIA members work in several industries. Sheet metal workers fabricate, install and service heating, venting, and air conditioning systems; blowpipe and industrial systems; metal roofing; coping and flashing; and stainless steel work for restaurants, kitchens and hospitals. They prepare shop and field drawings manually and with computer programs. Members also provide HVAC/R service.

    What do Sheet Metal Workers Do?
    Fabricate, Install and Service:
  • Heating, Venting, and Air Conditioning Systems
  • Blowpipe and Industrial Systems
  • Metal Roofing
  • Coping and Flashing
  • Stainless Steel Work for Restaurants, Kitchens and Hospitals
  • Apprenticeship

    The apprenticeship program for sheet metal workers combines on-the-job training with classroom instruction, which takes place at state-of-the art JATC owned facilities or in the vocational training departments of local school and/or community colleges. Each JATC program has its own computers, which allows the JATC to deliver training, monitor progress, and communicate with other apprenticeship programs through the International Training Institute (ITI) home page.
    The apprenticeship program lasts four years, during which apprentices receive wages and benefits as well as top-of-the-line instruction at no cost! In the first and second year, apprentices learn about drafting, sheet metal tools, safety procedures, pattern layout and development as well as how mathematics applies to the trade. In the third year, apprentices work more on their own, and will learn how to install HVAC equipment, welding, hoisting and rigging, and retrofitting environmental systems. Finally, in the fourth year, apprentices learn about fine tuning HVAC systems and welding techniques. Of course, by the end of the fourth year apprentices attain journeyperson status!
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Sheet Metal Workers' wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors. Some apprenticeship programs partner with community colleges to offer college credit for apprenticeship classes.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    Sheet metal workers perform all types of tasks using metal. They design, fabricate and install heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. When an air conditioning system breaks or has problems, it is the sheet metal workers who use computers to troubleshoot the problem and then perform the service work to correct it. Sheet metal workers are responsible for the stainless steel cabinets and countertops you see in restaurants and cafeterias. They also perform work on skylights, signs, metal ceilings and downspouts.

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    International Brotherhood of Teamsters
    ironworkers logo

    Trades

    Inventory Control Personnel
    Truck Driver
    Warehouse Operations

    The Teamsters union has several divisions, including a Building Material and Construction Trades Division. Members in this division are truck drivers who transport and haul material, merchandise, equipment or personnel between various locations--including construction sites, manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, and wholesale and retail facilities. They may also load and unload, make minor mechanical repairs and keep trucks in good working order.

    Apprenticeship

    In the near future, the Teamsters National Education and Training Fund will offer regional training programs. In the meantime, we can direct you to alternative resources to earn a Commercial Drivers License (CDL). A CDL is a requirement for obtaining a union position with a major or local freight carrier covered under the National Master Freight Agreement.
    Teamster drivers are highly skilled due to a combination of education, training and experience. When it comes to education and training we recommend driver-training courses certified by the Professional Truck Driving Institute (PTDI). PTDI certifies driver-training courses that meet training standards established and recognized by both industry and government. PTDI gives students the foundation to become quality and safe drivers. The Teamsters have representation in the development of PTDI's training standards and on the PTDI Board of Directors.
    You earn while you learn the trade. Union journeymen Teamsters wages and fringe benefits are negotiated on their behalf by the union through collective bargaining with signatory contractors.
    Wages vary according to the geographic location of the local union. The average starting wage for 1st year apprentices is 40 - 50% of the Journeyman's wage rate plus fringe benefits. Your earnings are adjusted annually to reflect your advancing skills and increasing knowledge of the trade.

    What type of job will I do?

    The Construction Teamster is a truck driver whose job can be quite diversified, depending on the size of the contracting firm for whom he or she is employed. Teamsters skillfully operate a variety of trucks, including flat beds, tandems, ready-mix and dumps. Construction Teamsters are an important part of a construction team because they are responsible for delivering the materials to the jobsite.

    More about this Trade Union

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